Resources

New and Noteworthy Books in the History of the Human Sciences

Since the early seventeenth century, stories of encounters with strange children in unusual circumstances have been recorded, circulated, and reproduced in Europe and North America not simply as myths, legends, or good tabloid copy but as occurrences deserving serious scrutiny … Continue reading

John Carson is the winner of the 2003 FHHS Article Prize and the 1994 FHHS Dissertation Prize How have modern democracies squared their commitment to equality with their fear that disparities in talent and intelligence might be natural, persistent, and … Continue reading

Rarely does the world see as versatile a figure as Herbert Simon. A Nobel laureate in economics, he was an accomplished political scientist, winner of a lifetime achievement award from the American Psychological Association, and founder of the Department of … Continue reading

Winner of the 2005 David Pinckney Prize, sponsored by The Society for French Historical Studies. In the wake of the French Revolution, as attempts to restore political stability to France repeatedly failed, a group of concerned intellectuals identified a likely … Continue reading

This book is the first comprehensive history of the development of child study during the early part of the twentieth century. Most nineteenth-century scientists deemed children unsuitable subjects for study, and parents were hostile to the idea. But by 1935, … Continue reading

Karl Pearson, founder of modern statistics, came to this field by way of passionate early studies of philosophy and cultural history as well as ether physics and graphical geometry. His faith in science grew out of a deeply moral quest, … Continue reading

This volume provides a history of the concepts, practices, institutions, and ideologies of social sciences (including behavioural and economic sciences) since the eighteenth century. It offers original, synthetic accounts of the historical development of social knowledge, including its philosophical assumptions, … Continue reading

Defining Difference is the first book to bring together recent scholarship on the history of psychology and race. Throughout the history of the field, psychological discourse has been shaped by social concerns, and its discourse on race is no exception. … Continue reading

Inventing Personality examines the early career of Gordon Allport (1897–1967) to reveal the history of the personality category he championed. Drawing on an extensive array of previously unpublished biographical materials, Nicholson masterfully combines biography with intellectual history to reveal the … Continue reading